Indigenous Mapping Network at UC Berkeley "Carve the Land, Carve the People" Simon Lambert 10/16

The Indigenous Mapping Network, American Indian Graduate Student Association, and Asia Pacific Indigenous Alliance invite you to attend:

"Whakairo te whenua, Whakairo te tangata:
Carve the land, Carve the People"

Dr. Simon J. Lambert - Maori Geographer
Lincoln University, New Zealand

“In this presentation, I explore the geohistory of Maori land use with
an emphasis on contemporary challenges. In particular I wish to tease
out a relationship between social capital and its connections to
socio-ecological resilience, and an explicitly cultural resilience.”

Through the post-contact history of Māori, the Indigenous people of
Aotearoa/New Zealand, runs the history of some of modernity’s most
radical technological revolutions. In a little over two centuries,
Māori transitioned from a stone-age people through mercantile
capitalism and its military accoutrements, fought intensive wars over
land and commerce among themselves and with foreign invaders, and
survived threats of cultural, even physical, extinction. Recovering
through a politico-cultural renaissance in all its artistic and
commercial socio-technologies, Māori now engage in corporate ventures
that have a significant presence in the agri/aqua-food sectors. 
Throughout this history, a constant trope of Māori culture and
development has been the importance of family and tribal networks of
trust, support and guidance. This very traditional social capital has
been complemented, challenged and perhaps supplanted by networks that
originate with assimilationist and modernising ideologies of
colonisation. These hybrid networks now comprise the ‘sociability’ in
which Māori individuals and collectives aid and abet their development.

Yet
much debate seems to centre on the clear lack of Māori social capital.
Standard social indicators continue to communicate the vulnerability of
Māori. In the areas of employment, health and education, Māori ‘lag’
behind Pākeha and, more importantly, their own aspirations. While
winning many legal, political and commercial battles, Māori
collectively experience an uneasy relationship with State and corporate
authority. Such dis-ease is now exacerbated by a recession that has
seen a rapid increase in Māori unemployment and a corresponding
dismantling of many social programmes. Once again, Māori sociability is
under threat.

The antidote to this is assumed to be greater/better/more economic
development. Strategic eyes turn to Māori agri- and aquacultural
development, the ‘sleeping giants’ of New Zealand’s economy which,
through antecedent pathways of a Māori presence in primary production,
embed pathways to the future. In this presentation, I explore the
geohistory of Maori land use with an emphasis on contemporary
challenges. In particular I wish to tease out a relationship between
social capital and its connections to socio-ecological resilience, and
an explicitly cultural resilience.


LOCATION: 112 Hilgard Hall, UCB, Berkeley, CA 94720

Head east on University, which ends on Oxford. Make a left on Oxford
and enter parking lot, by turning right at Berkeley Way, across from
Yali's Cafe.

From downtown Berkeley Bart, head east on Center Street. Cross
Oxford onto campus. Take semi-circular path that veers to left. Turn
right at the West Gate, and walk on the left side of the street. Walk
up and onto Wickson Road. Wellman Hall entrance is on the left. Hilgard
is on its left.

ALSO, Hilgard Hall is directly in front of Mulford Hall, the location of our previous 3 meetings.

BACKGROUND:

Indigenous Mapping Network meetings at UC-Berkeley convene mapping practitioners,
indigenous community members, indigenous rights organizations,
researchers, and technology professionals to discuss current issues in
indigenous mapping.

Our
meetings are intended to create a platform for supporting indigenous
mapping collaborations and linking communities with emerging
technologies.

Mapping approaches can include thought-maps, performance, materials, as well as GIS, web, and mobile phone technologies.


For more information visit

http://indigenousmapping.net
or contact Sibyl Diver, student chapter president of Indigenous Mapping Network at Berkeley, sdiver@berkeley.edu or Rosemarie McKeon, IMN board member, rosemarie.mckeon@gmail.com