Seeing the Ocean through the Trees: a Conservation-Based Development Strategy for Clayoquot Sound

SEEING THE OCEAN THROUGH THE TREES: A CONSERVATION-BASED DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR CLAYOQUOT SOUND
by Ecotrust Canada, 1997

Ecotrust Canada's book features the first ever landscape analysis of the findings of the Scientific Panel for Sustainable Forestry Practices in Clayoquot Sound. After the so-called "Clayoquot summer" of 1993 - when more than 800 people were arrested for protesting the government's land-use decision that year - the scientific panel was asked to produce world-class logging standards for Clayoquot Sound. The analysis that shows that fully 20,000 cubic metres of timber per year can be sustainably harvested from Clayoquot Sound, and the protection of the Sound's remaining pristine watersheds can be secured.

In addition to its findings concerning the rate of logging, Seeing the Ocean Through the Trees includes a set of recommendations that describe the necessary elements to move Clayoquot Sound's economy away from its dependence on forest products towards a truly sustainable economy. These include redrawing Clayoquot Sound's administrative boundaries to coincide with watershed boundaries, thus reflecting natural processes; creating a set of community indicators for measuring socio-economic and ecosystem health over time; and establishing a permanent development institution to offer marketing, managerial and technical support, and non-bank credit to local businesses, in order to promote responsible business practices and to help grow a green market for sustainably produced goods.
For ordering information, contact Ecotrust Canada, (604) 682-4141

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Salmon Nation: People and Fish at the Edge

SALMON NATION
People and Fish at the Edge

Edited by Edward C. Wolf and Seth Zuckerman,1999

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Stolen Lands, Broken Promises

Researching the Indian Land Question in British Columbia (Second Edition)
edited by Leigh Ogston

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From Elder's Knowledge to Co-Management Utilizing Participatory Action Research (PAR) and a Geogrraphic Information System (GIS)

FROM ELDER'S KNOWLEDGE TO CO-MANAGEMENT UTILIZING PARTICIPATORY ACTION RESEARCH (PAR) AND A GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) - An Article Review
Robinson, Mike and Ozzie Sawicki. 1996. "From Elders' Knowledge to Co-Management Utilizing Participatory Action Research (PAR) and a Geopgraphical Information System (GIS)" Sustainable Forestry Partnerships: Forging a Network of Excellence. Pp. 122-128.

Mike Robinson and Ozzie Sawicki, both of the Arctic Institute of North America, provide a basic but detailed explanation of how participatory action research (PAR) and geographical information systems (GIS) can be combined to form a powerful resource decision-making tool. By joining PAR and GIS, traditional ecological knowledge and western scientific knowledge can be fused together. By incorporating both knowledge systems into decision-making, sustainability and economic development can be realized.

Robinson and Sawicki stress the importance of PAR as a research method when mapping cultural land use and developing co-management plans.The primary goal of a PAR project is to contribute towards community development via adult education. Essentially, PAR is process by which researchers/trainers will enter a community with the objective of training local members until the trainers are no longer needed – the community can solve problems locally without relying on external assistance. Because the community is the core to any PAR project, the original problem must be defined by the community, the research must involve the entire community and the problem must be solved by the community.

The article goes on to provide a very informative overview of GI,S including hardware and software requirements and GPS. The authors describe three GIS systems, low, medium, and high cost systems, and the advantages and disadvantages of each. In addition, Robinson and Sawicki define the key terms of GIS systems and list the key requirements that every GIS should include. They tailor this discussion towards small communities that seek an efficient and effective computer-based GIS.

"From Elder’s Knowledge to Co-Management Utilizing Participatory Action Research (PAR) and a Geographic Information System (GIS)" is a thorough overview of a research methodology that seeks to promote healthy communities by allowing them to become self-reliant and economically independent.

Review by Leah McMillin

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