Papers

A list of Papers and Journal Articles related to Aboriginal Mapping. Please contact us if you know of, or would like to submit, a paper.

PLEASE NOTE: The Aboriginal Mapping Network is not promoting any of the following authors or their work.The intent of this page is to provide an overview of some of the available written materials.

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Community GIS or Community vs GIS?

Bal Krishna

Abstract

In view of the advent of technology such as GIS, Remote Sensing, GPS and Internet, a situation is being created where a certain section of the society is able to avail the benefits of thesetechnologies where as a larger section of the society especially in rural areas, mostly in developing world is far from having any access of these technologies. As a consequence, these technologies may end up creating digital divide rather than being a tool to make the world digital. The proposed paper will deal with some fundamental issues how to take GIS to grassroots and moreover in the process if local community participation can be ensured. The paper will deliberate upon applicability and usability of GIS and related technology in rural context in terms of its affordability, acceptability, replicability, scalability and sustainability. Issues related to engaging community in the entire process of data collection, data interpretation and evolving some developmental plan will also be discussed by giving examples of some ongoing projects.

http://www.landcoalition.org/pdf/07_ev_alb_en_community_gis_or_community_vs_gis.pdf

 

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Combining Mobile GIS and Indigenous Knowledge in Community Managed Forests

Jeroen Verplanke

Abstract

For local communities in developing countries to be accredited for their forest management by international carbon funds, they need to supply verifiable data to support their claims. A PDA running ArcPad software and connected to a GPS can supply the necessary technology to do cost effective data collection in community forests that can be verified internationally. Experiments in Tanzania, India and Mali show that communities themselves using this technology can record their indigenous knowledge. This paper highlights the success of local communities in learning and using mobile GIS and the limits of this technology under difficult conditions. From these experiences a suggestion is made on how this technology could be practically implemented in developing countries.

http://gis.esri.com/library/userconf/proc04/docs/pap2101.pdf

*Full paper is attached below.

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Towards a post-colonial GIS

Kate Moore

Abstract

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The history and status of Spatial Data Infrastructure implementation (Zimbabwe)

Abstract

Prestige T Makanga, Dr Julian Smit and Charles Paradzayi

Spatial data is a key resource for the development of a nation. There is a lot of economic potential that is locked away in spatial data collections and this potential is realised by making the data widely available. Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) provide a platform for spatial data users, producers and those that manage it, to distribute the data more efficiently. Through SDI, the available spatial data resources are made available to those that need to use them for making more informed decision about location related phenomenon. Some previous research efforts point to the fact that more than 80% of decisions have a location component and that makes spatial data key in facilitating the decision making process. Although there has been considerable effort by organizations such the Global Spatial Data Infrastructure (GSDI) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) to spread an awareness of SDI and the important role they play in national development, their implementation is being done at a seemingly very slow pace in Africa.

       

This paper reviews the status of SDI implementation in Zimbabwe, a country that is experiencing high socio-economic and political uncertainty. It is anticipated that the document will help potential stakeholders that don‘t appreciate the importance of SDI to develop a new paradigm with regards to SDI development in the nation. It is also intended to help get the dormant SDI activity in Zimbabwe back on its feet. A brief background of SDI and its importance is outlined followed by the history and status of SDI activities in the country. The document ends by giving possible ways of reviving the ZSDI initiative in the highly volatile and uncertain Zimbabwean environment.

http://www.gsdi.org/newsletters/SDIAfricav7n9.pdf

Full paper attached below.

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